Home > Database, Open Source, PostgreSQL > Compiling and Installing PostgreSQL 9.1 from Source on Fedora 15 (64-bit)

Compiling and Installing PostgreSQL 9.1 from Source on Fedora 15 (64-bit)

Prerequisites

Last week I discussed various reasons why you would want to compile your open-source database from the project’s source code.  I wanted to give an example here of the process for compiling a particular database, PostgreSQL.  Version 9.1 of PostgreSQL was released on 2011-09-11, so the example below works with that code base.

I’m assuming in the following instructions that you’re starting with a sparkling, new Fedora installation.  In other words, you haven’t installed any of the dependencies (e.g., gcc, make, bison) that you’ll need for building the PostgreSQL source code.  I used Fedora 15, 64-bit.

To grab the most up-to-date Postgres code, you’ll want to check it out from the git repository.  If git is not installed on your system, install it.
$ sudo yum install git
There are a number of libraries and software programs that you’ll need if you’re going to build PostgresSQL.  The easiest way to get all of them is to use the yum-builddep command.  (This will also install flex, bison, and Perl, if they are not already present on your system).
$ sudo yum-builddep postgresql
Among other software and libraries, yum should offer to install bison, flex, and tcl.  However, yum-builddep for postgresql does not install the gcc compiler, which you will also need.  To get gcc installed, run the command:
$ sudo yum install gcc

Check out the Source Code using Git

Grabbing the code via git is a very simple one-line command.

$ git clone git://git.postgresql.org/git/postgresql.git
This checks the source code out into a sub-directory of your current location, called postgresql.

Configure the Build

A full list of the configuration options available at the command line is described in the “PostgreSQL 9.1.0 Documentation“.  For this example, I ran a fairly vanilla configuration, but added features for SQL/XML in the database.
$ cd postgresql
$ ./configure --with-libxml --with-libxslt

Make and Install

Now that you’ve fine-tuned exactly how you want Postgres built, you’ll run the fairly standard make and install steps.
$ gmake
Note that you must run the install step as a privileged user, since access to the /usr/local directory (it’s there, at /usr/local/pgsql/bin, that the binary files will live) is restricted by default.
$ sudo gmake install

Post-Installation and Database Configuration

You’ll want to run PostgreSQL as a specific, non-root user, postgres.  So, create this user.

$ sudo adduser postgres
$ sudo passwd postgres

Now, change user to the newborn postgres user to run the database initialization.

$ su - postgres

First, set the environment variables for locating needed libraries and executables.

$ LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/local/pgsql/lib; export LD_LIBRARY_PATH
$ PATH=$PATH:/usr/local/pgsql/bin; export PATH

Now, create a directory to contain the server’s data files.

$ mkdir <directory_for_database_data_files>

Run the initdb command to initialize the PostgreSQL server.

$ initdb -D <directory_for_database_data_files>

I recommend creating a specific directory for the server log files.

$ mkdir <directory_for_server_log_files>

Starting the Server

Start the server as the postgres user, indicating the location of data files and the location of the server log files.

$ postgres -D <directory_for_data files> ><directory_for_server_log_files>/server.log 2>&1 &

There shouldn’t be any errors that prevent the server from starting, but if you inspect the log file you should see the following messages.

LOG: database system is ready to accept connections
LOG: autovacuum launcher started

Your server should be up and running, ready to accept your client connections!

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